East Area Rapist Suspect Has Been Caught

By Paul Scholl and Rich Peters  |  2018-04-25

Sacramento County District Attorney Anne Marie Schubert addressed hundreds of media members, law enforcement agents and politicians on Wednesday afternoon at a press conference at the District Attorney Crime Lab in Sacramento. Photo by Rich Peters

SACRAMENTO, CA (MPG) - The Sacramento County Sheriff's Department and the District Attorney’s Office have confirmed a significant break in the search for the East Area Rapist.

Law enforcement sources have named 72-year-old Joseph James DeAngelo as the suspect arrested in the case.

Many law enforcement agencies, both local and federal, converged on DeAngelo's home in Citrus Heights on Wednesday, April 25. He was arrested at approximately 2:30 am. He was booked on two counts of murder from a Ventura County Sheriff’s Department warrant. Agencies were later seen removing boxes of evidence from the home after the arrest.

DeAngelo lived in a neighborhood near Old Auburn and Twin Oaks, on Canyon Oaks Drive.

This case has been open for decades. Law Enforcement believes the East Area Rapist or Golden State Killer was responsible for at least 12 homicides, approximately 50 rapes and some 120 home burglaries. All the crimes spanned a decade starting in the late 1970s and into the mid-1980s throughout the Sacramento region, the San Francisco Bay Area and in Southern California.

The East Area Rapist is believed to be responsible for at least nine sexual assaults in Sacramento, six more in Rancho Cordova and Citrus Heights, four in Carmichael and two in Orangevale.

The FBI web site states: “Burglaries and rapes began occurring in the eastern district of Sacramento County—hence the name East Area Rapist—in the summer of 1976. The subject ransacked homes and took coins, jewelry, and identification. Neighborhood burglaries were often followed by clusters of sexual assaults. Then, on February 2, 1978, Brian Maggiore and his wife, Katie, were on an evening walk with their dog in their Rancho Cordova neighborhood when they were chased down and murdered. After July 1981, no associated incidents are known until 1986, when an 18-year-old woman was raped and murdered in Irvine, California—the last known crime associated with the subject.”

“For us here in Sacramento it was a time of innocence in 1976,” said Sacramento District Attorney Anne Marie Schubert at Wednesday’s press conference. “For anyone who lived here the memories are vivid.”

The Sacramento DA’s Office confirmed DeAngelo was employed twice with law enforcement agencies, including the Auburn Police Department. 

News reports say neighbors claimed DeAngelo was occasionally prone to profane outbursts heard throughout the neighborhood. It was also reported that he has lived in the neighborhood for more than 30 years.  Neighbors were shocked that all this was happening in their neighborhood. Later reports said DeAngelo is now on suicide watch.

"It is the most prolific unsolved serial killing case probably in modern history," said Schubert. “This case affected the entire state.”

Sacramento County Sheriff Scott Jones told the media that agencies also report that the East Area Rapist was also known as the Golden State Killer, the Original Night Stalker and the Diamond Knot Killer.

Schubert, who is passionate about the pursuit of justice through DNA evidence and cold case prosecution, formed the Cold Case Prosecution Unit in 2002 and served as its first prosecutor. 

“The answer was in the DNA,” Schubert explained. “It is fitting that today is National DNA Day.”

Rancho Cordova's History

A Clean Sweep for Creeks

Story and photos by Susan Maxwell Skinner  |  2018-04-20

Sacramento County youth organizations rallied to clean up waterways during Creek Week. Girl Scout Troops 333 (Antelope) and 890 (Foothill Farms) celebrated a job well done during festivities at Carmichael park.

SACRAMENTO REGION, CA (MPG) - A party celebrating Creek Week caused a big splash – and vital lessons in water conservation – last weekend at Carmichael Park.

Many sponsoring agencies sent an unfiltered message: everyone must do their bit to save and protect water. Early that morning, 2,000 volunteers from youth and neighborhood groups formed an army to scour 85 locations.  Creeks from the Delta to Folsom and from Elk Grove to Antelope benefited from the clean-up.

Four work areas within the Rancho Cordova community yielded 1,420 pounds of trash. City biologists also conducted a nature walk along the recently-restored banks of Cordova Creek.  The tour celebrated revitalization of a formerly barren channel; Cordova Creek Naturalization Project replaced decades-old concrete creek lining with tons of river rock. Achieved in partnership between city, Sacramento County and the non-profit Water Forum, the three-mile effort has recreated 10 acres of vegetated habitat.

Now 28 years old, Sacramento County’s Creek Week program aims to refresh dozens of waterways by removing garbage and invasive plants. The annual volunteer work force is swelled by the Sacramento Regional Conservation Corps, whose members recycle dumped rubber tires.

Beyond tires, mattresses and shopping carts, the 2018 junk-hunt gleaned many tons of smaller stuff alien to healthy arteries.  Sacramento Area Creeks Council President Alta Tura noted that high waters from recent rains washed much trash downstream into river flows.  “At the same time, more garbage entered our creeks and was trapped by vegetation,” she said. “Cigarette butts, plastic straws and fast food packaging are more damaging to wildlife than big stuff. Animals ingest plastic and can end up starving to death. Waterfowl can become entangled in discarded fishing lines. There’s no place in our waterways for plastic in any form, yet thousands of plastic items were among the tons of junk we bagged. The volunteers did a stellar job.”

At Carmichael Park, rewards for the weary army included clean tee shirts and hot dogs dished up by Carmichael Chamber of Commerce and Mission Oaks Park District volunteers.  “The party celebrates everyone’s hard work,” said Tura.  “It also teaches people about nature; how to save water and be better stewards of our environment.”

Learn more about the annual creek cleanup at www.creekweek.net

To report illegally dumped tires to the Sacramento Regional Conservation Corps, call (916) 792-0429.

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Cordova Softball Shuts Out Union Mine

By Rich Peters, MPG Editor  |  2018-04-20

Sophomore pitcher Alexis Wygand is 5-6 with a 4.58 ERA for the Lancers this season. Photo by Rick Sloan

RANCHO CORDOVA, CA (MPG) - For the second day in a row the Lancers defeated an overmatched Union Mine team, shutting them out 8-0. A day prior, Cordova knocked out 23 hits in route to a 15-1 victory over the Diamondbacks to take game one of the series in dominant fashion.

Cordova (5-6, 2-4) kept those hot bats rolling in game two, led by a pair of hits from Cassie Rucker, Emika Love and Erica Jackson. The freshman Jackson also knocked in two RBIs on the day. Rucker and Love lead the team in hitting with .533 and .429 batting averages, respectively.

Sophomore Alexis Wygand threw a complete game shutout for the Lancers, allowing just five hits and one walk while striking out four along the way. She pitched a complete game and allowed only one run the day before, stifling the Diamondbacks two days in a row.

Ahead for the Lancers is a matchup with Vista del Lago on Friday, April 20. First pitch is at 7pm under the lights at Folsom Lake College. They follow that up with a double-header in Galt on Tuesday, April 24. Game one is set for a 1pm first pitch.

The Lancers currently sit in third place of the Sierra Valley Conference standings behind Liberty Ranch and Rosemont. Union Mine resides at the bottom of the pack with just a 1-6 record overall.

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Keeping Promises to Our Veterans

By Paul Scholl  |  2018-04-20

Many of the leaders of the project, along with city officials, joined together to break ground on the next phases of Veterans Village. Photo by Paul Scholl

RANCHO CORDOVA, CA (MPG) - Some days just make you really proud to be a part of something bigger. On April 10, Veterans Village took another big step forward toward completion. With the groundbreaking ceremony, Phases II and III were officially launched for the project aimed at housing more of our nation’s veterans.

Through really tough economic times of the last eight years, the project saw many limitations and obstacles. The people who had the vision and the understanding of the desperate need for it to become reality forged ahead. They found new partners who could help make it happen.

California has 10% of the US veteran population. It also has 29% of the homeless veteran population. It was stated that there are approximately 450 homeless veterans in our immediate region. Veterans Village, when completed, will house 146 veterans.

Most of the people and organizations that have played a part in the creation, concept and construction of the project attended the ceremony.  You could see the pride on their faces and hear it in their conversations.

For more information on this story, please see the special release on the back page. You will also find a list of the organizations and the amazing array of partners who have been vital to its success. Be sure to thank them.

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CRPD 60th Anniversary Honored at Fine Art Exhibit

By Margaret Snider  |  2018-04-20

Photographer Rick Sloan is shown with some of his numerous photos of Rancho Cordova events in the fine arts exhibit honoring the Cordova Recreation and Park Districts 60th anniversary. Photo by Jose Lopez

RANCHO CORDOVA, CA (MPG) - The theme of this quarter’s Rancho Cordova fine arts exhibit is “In the Park.” The exhibit, to be displayed at Rancho Cordova City Hall through July 28, honors the 60th Anniversary of the Cordova Recreation and Park District.  Artists and art lovers attended the reception on April 12 to see 53 works by 31 artists.  Many of those chosen to be in the juried show have already had art works selected many times since the program started in 2012.  This has provided an opportunity for the public to see the artists’ talents emerge and evolve over a period of time. The show is put on by Rancho Cordova Arts and sponsored by the Cordova Community Council.

One of the frequent contributors is photographer Rick Sloan, who also is on the board of directors of CRPD.  “I’m an artist, a graphic designer, a photographer, and a park board director all rolled up into one,” Sloan said.  Sloan provided some of his images of Rancho Cordova events for a special display on the walls of the upper floor at City Hall, and the community council had them enlarged onto canvas.  “The City of Rancho Cordova has become such a great stage,” Sloan said.  “I put myself into the experience.  I zoom in and try to feel what it’s like to be dancing or singing on stage, playing a tuba in a parade on a hot summer day, running with a football.”  Sloan also created the logo in use to celebrate CRPD’s 60th anniversary. 

Artist Ron Hall is another long term participant who has paintings in this exhibit.  “I’m constantly trying to see and try new things and stretch outside my comfort zone,” Hall said.   

Marsha Mason used a different technique for her watercolor, “First Glance,” that requires the artist to “pour” different colors onto the page.  “Every time you pour, you have to let it dry,” Mason said.  “After trying that technique I decided it takes too long – I’m impatient.”  Mason is working on a sculpture for the next show.  In June Mason will take her place as president of Rancho Cordova Arts and Ron Hall will become vice president. 

Not all of the artists in this show have been around long term.  Autra Oliver is a relative newcomer both to Rancho Cordova and to art.  She works mostly in acrylics, and has two works in this show.  “I thought at first that I was going to be doing more fantasy art,” Oliver said. “But I find that I’m doing more nature art.  I love flowers.” With her younger child about to reach her first birthday, Oliver is planning to get out more and meet other local artists. 

The juror for this exhibit of fine art by Rancho Cordova artists is Corey Okada, who grew up in Rancho Cordova and attended Cordova High School.  His work has been shown extensively locally and regionally and has appeared in the Crocker-Kingsley Exhibition. He won the best of show award at the 2017 KVIE art auction.

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Investment Supports Local Economy and Businesses

RANCHO CORDOVA, CA (MPG) - The Rancho Cordova City Council voted to invest $5 million each into Five Star Bank and American River Bank in connection with the Responsible Investment for a Stronger Economy (RISE) initiative.

“The decision to invest millions in local banks underscores the City of Rancho Cordova’s commitment to supporting our local economy and businesses,” says Mayor of Rancho Cordova, Linda Budge. “The RISE program is built on the strong presence of local banks in the community, which have been beneficial for the City’s economic growth and development, while also meeting the individual needs of our residents.”

The decision was made after Region Finance, a trade association of Sacramento Region Business Association which is comprised of community banks, reached out to ask that the City of Rancho Cordova adopt RISE as a new tool for economic growth and business expansion.

“We applaud the City of Rancho Cordova for choosing to help our economy RISE and thank the City Council for its leadership,” said Josh Wood, CEO of Sacramento Region Business Association.  “RISE is a groundbreaking yet simple policy where local governments redirect their funds to local banks who are dedicated to investing those funds to grow small businesses in our community.”

It is the intention of the RISE program to:

·         Pay an attractive interest/earnings rate that will be tied to the most recently published Local Agency Investment Fund (LAIF) monthly interest earnings rate.

·         Lend no less than 50 percent of City funds on deposit to small and medium businesses in the City of Rancho Cordova.

·         Provide streamlined, local underwriting for businesses working with RISE

·         Promote the City as a leader in the Sacramento region’s community bank RISE initiative.

·         Promote the Community Bank/City partnership through RISE and when possible publicize loans made with City funds.

James Beckwith, President and CEO of Five Star Bank, said, “We are excited to partner with the City of Rancho Cordova in the RISE initiative and look forward to the economic development that will result from the City’s investment.  We expect funds invested in RISE to enhance and serve Rancho Cordova in many ways, including job growth, housing and services to local residents.” 

“As a bank headquartered in Rancho Cordova, we are honored to be one of the inaugural partners in the RISE program,” said David E. Ritchie, Jr., President and CEO of American River Bank. “Investment in our local economy is the cornerstone of our mission as a community bank and RISE aligns with our ongoing commitment to serving local business.”

In order to be considered for this investment opportunity, these experienced institutions have proven they can provide protection of public funds, demonstrated financial strength, and complied with several other qualifications of the proposal.

Along with meeting several other qualifications, financial institutions had met the requirement of displaying its institution’s financial strength and having corporate headquarters located in Sacramento, El Dorado, Placer, and/or Yolo County.

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2018-19 Watershed Stewardship and Education Grant

Sac County News  |  2018-04-19

Photo courtesy Sac County News

SACRAMENTO REGION, CA (MPG) - ​The Sacramento County Stormwater Quality Program is accepting applications for the 2018-19 Watershed Stewardship and Education Grant.  Each year,​ the Stormwater Quality Program offers schools, non-profit, and community organizations up to $2,500 for projects to help students understand the importance of keeping local creeks and rivers clean and healthy.

This is the 13th year the County is offering grants to help raise awareness about the need for protecting creeks and rivers.  By collaborating with schools over the years, the County has seen positive results from students who participate in the program and show a better understanding of stormwater pollution.  Expanding this program to non-profits and community groups offers another avenue to increase education.
Thirty-five schools have participated in the program.  Will Rogers Middle School is one of the original participants and has taken part in the program every year since it launched in 2005. 

Over the years, grant winners have completed 85 projects like creek clean ups; hands on education about Sacramento’s watershed, creeks, or rivers; eco-friendly gardens; water quality experiments to assess the health of a creek/river; and school-wide campaigns to increase awareness about stormwater pollution.  Each year, grant winners submit a report to the County on their projects shows many of the students in the program gaining a better understanding of stormwater pollution and the environment.
Eligible projects must in some way protect or enhance local creeks, rivers, or watersheds.  Projects will generally fall into one or more of the following categories:

  • Educational Projects - Projects that inform or instruct about the aquatic ecosystem, watersheds, or stormwater pollution prevention
  • School/Club Projects - Projects that can be organized by teachers, classrooms, or clubs
  • Community Outreach Projects - Projects that involve and inspire the community
  • Monitoring Project - Projects that measure water quality, species, or habitat
  • Restoration Projects - Projects that restore or enhance riparian habitats, wetlands, creeks, or rivers

Eligible projects must be implemented within the Stormwater Utility boundaries of Sacramento County or directly affect the residents of these areas.  The application for the 2018-19 Watershed Stewardship and Education Grant is available on the Stormwater Quality Program webpage.


The application deadline is July 1, and the grants are awarded in August.

For more information, contact Jeanette Huddleston at 916-​874‐4711 or huddlestonj@saccounty.net.

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Qualifying Veterans and Japanese American Citizens May Receive Belated High School Diplomas

By Operation Recognition  |  2018-04-18

SACRAMENTO REGION, CA (MPG) - The Sacramento County Office of Education (SCOE) wants to honor the many contributions of those whose education was interrupted due to wartime circumstances. Current and former Sacramento County residents who left high school to serve in the U.S. military during World War II, the Korean War or the Vietnam War, and received an honorable discharge, may contact SCOE to receive their high school diplomas. SCOE also presents diplomas to Japanese American citizens forced to leave high school due to WW II internment. Individuals may request diplomas on behalf of themselves or qualifying family members, including persons now deceased. Those who earned a G.E.D., or graduated from high school while in an internment camp, are still eligible for diplomas. To be considered for the spring 2017 awards ceremony, submit applications by April 26, 2017. Applications are available from the Sacramento County Office of Education by calling (916) 228-2416 or visiting scoe.net/or.

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Trump, Brown Tangle Over California State Border Control

By Rich Peters, MPG Editor  |  2018-04-18

Governor Jerry Brown

SACRAMENTO REGION, CA (MPG) - California Governor Jerry Brown spoke at the National Press Club in Washington D.C. on Tuesday, defending his sanctuary cities and claiming that the country’s immigration debate has become “an inflammatory football that very low-life politicians like to exploit.” He continued, “And I think it’s shocking, it’s despicable and it’s harmful to California, mostly to the people.”

Brown let it be known that he has no plans of changing his stance on the state’s immigration and sanctuary cities.

“We’re not backing off,” Brown said. “And I believe we have the legal horsepower to block the immediate legal moves by the Trump administration.”

The 80-year-old Brown, who is in the final months of his second term as California governor, proclaimed, “I’m not riding off into the sunset. You can be sure that you’ll hear from me.”

Just before Brown spoke on Tuesday, President Donald Trump tweeted, “Looks like Jerry Brown and California are not looking for safety and security along their very porous Border. He cannot come to terms for the National Guard to patrol and protect the Border. The high crime rate will only get higher. Much wanted Wall in San Diego already started!”

Trump took to Twitter once again on Wednesday morning, saying that many parts of sanctuary cities throughout California want out of Jerry Brown’s control.

“There is a Revolution going on in California,” Trump tweeted. “Soooo many Sanctuary areas want OUT of this ridiculous, crime infested & breeding concept. Jerry Brown is trying to back out of the National Guard at the Border, but the people of the State are not happy. Want Security & Safety NOW!”

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Coach Guy Anderson Honored by the ABCA

By Rich Peters, MPG Editor  |  2018-04-13

Recipients of the 2018 ABCA Dave Keilitz Ethics in Coaching Award: Longtime Stanford Cardinal head coach Mark Marquess (left) and Guy Anderson (right) with award committee chair Tom O’Connell. Photo courtesy American Baseball Coaches Association

Discusses Storied Career and the Current State of Baseball

SACRAMENTO REGION, CA (MPG) - “I’ve been accused of being old school; which I am,” professed legendary baseball coach Guy Anderson.

I sat down with the winner of 927 high school ballgames for a cup of coffee in Gold River on what was a perfect day for baseball. I showed up early, but Anderson was already there, sitting outside. Meeting with him for the first time, I wasn’t sure what to expect. I had only heard stories.

Despite the crowded patio, I knew exactly who Anderson was. You can always tell with baseball guys. We quickly jumped into conversation, as if we’d picked right back up from our last one. The spry, 85-year-old had freshly returned from a Spring Break tournament in Anaheim. Now the assistant coach for Capital Christian High School, Anderson led the Cordova Lancers program for 45 years, winning 17 league titles, five section titles and coaching 24 players who would eventually be drafted by Major League organizations.

Earlier this year he received the American Baseball Coaches Association Dave Keilitz Ethics in Coaching Award. He attended the awards ceremony at the Indiana Convention Center in Indianapolis to accept the award last January. Anderson told me what an honor the award was and how much it meant to him, but also how fortunate he is to have been able to coach such great players throughout the years.

“I compare coaching a little bit to being a jockey,” he explained. “You don’t win on a donkey; you’ve got to have a stallion to win the big ones. I’ve had some pretty good guys that could play the game very well.”

For a man who has dedicated much of his life to coaching and teaching others, he has enjoyed the fact that this award is not just about him, but a recognition of who he is and what he so proudly stands for. “This award was outstanding for me, I’ve been fortunate to be put in a few Hall of Fames. Like I said, you’ve got to have the stallions - it’s important to have the players - but this one here was more, to me, about who I am.”

I asked the self-proclaimed “old school” coach how the game has evolved over the many decades of ballgames that he has taken part of. “If you start at the Major League level, it’s the money. The money is a big difference now and it’s an entertainment rather than a sport.”

Anderson then addressed the collegiate level, summarizing a recent game that he and his Capital Christian team attended when they were in Southern California for their tournament. “The college level is still good baseball and I’ll give you an example. The leadoff batter gets a base hit and the next guy lays down a sacrifice bunt. Early in the game, go get that first run.”

What Anderson stressed throughout our conversation about today’s game was that sacrifice bunting, or any sort of personal sacrifice at all, is a dying art – especially at the pro level. In last year’s 2017 MLB season, a record 6,105 home runs were hit, topping the 5,963 belted in 2000 at the height of the Steroid Era. Strikeouts set a record for the 10th straight season at 40,104 and sacrifice bunts fell to their lowest level since the year 1900 at 925. To put that last number into perspective, there were only eight teams in 1900 and they played anywhere between 140 and 146 games compared to the 30 teams and 162 game schedule in today’s game.

But individual numbers can mean a lot more than team wins and the kind of contributions that won’t show up in the box score to today’s young players. The pressures to perform at a high level have trickled down to a lower age group, making the game a more individualistic sport. Whereas only seniors used to worry about playing at the college level, now underclassmen are receiving recruitment letters and are forced to think about the future rather than living in the moment.

“Play now, play the best you can and good things will happen,” said Anderson. “Don’t worry about next year or you may not get there.” From early recruitment to travel ball to personal coaches and trainers, there are new politics in the game of baseball.

But Anderson also understands that when you’re in the game as long as he has been, things are bound to take on a different shape over time. That’s part of life. “We lost one thing in basketball a few years ago, and we’re losing it in baseball now, and that’s the same color shoes,” Anderson joked. “You go back to the military. You’re a team when you all look alike. And that’s why I’ve always liked the Yankees; they never put the name on the back.”

Coach Guy Anderson is the very embodiment of America’s pastime - a true throwback in every sense of the word; rich in history and accolades, but willing to accept the evolution of the game, whether he fully agrees with it or not. And that’s what great coaches do. They lay down a stern foundation of the history and fundamentals of the game, and the rest, the improvisation, is up to you. And when it comes right down to it, Anderson and the game of baseball may have evolved, but they’ll never truly change.

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